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New Ecocenter Solution in Lemmer by Modulo

Modulo Recycle

Modulo has installed a new eco-centre solution in Lemmer, The Netherlands. The site includes hazardous waste. The project was installed within 1 week. The system is replacing the site previously used to accept residential and small business drop off items. The City of Lemmer was closely working with Modulo from the start of the project. The City wanted to combine the public works yard with residential and small business drop of activities.

Modulo and the City have worked closely together in order top prepare site process, site layouts, detailed design, as well as the tender documents for the site works. The Modulo elements as well as the concrete pad are made of recycled concrete.

Building with precast elements is superior to building pour in place solutions. The “ load” factors are significantly lower as compared to conventional construction. Aso, the Modulo solution can be re-used and therefor is meeting the highest environmental targets, which is the re-use of the solutions.

In addition the solution provides the use of the space under the deck. This will allow to accept many more items as well as makes the solution flexible and future – proof.

More Details – https://www.modulocare4circulair.nl/bouw-milieustraat-lemmer-gestart-met-plaatsing-lekbakken-kca/

Candiac Contract Award

Modulo Recycle

On July 23 Candiac, Quebec selected Modulo to supply and install the patented modular Modulo EcoCentre/ public drop off solution.  The ecocenter will be installed early September 2019, which is less than 2 months after the contract award.

Modulo is steadily growing and within the next few months will have already installed 8 solutions in Ontario and Quebec. Modulo’s proposal came in as the cheapest and most flexible alternative.  Its solutions and expertise in the field of residential drop off of recyclables are becoming increasingly popular.  In Quebec Provence Interested potential customers are able to visit 5 Modulo solution within 1-day drive.

Modulo’s patented solutions provide many benefits to its customers:

– easy to design
– 200% space use: on deck and under deck.
– easily expandable
– optimized and safe operations
– quick and easy to install
– aesthetically attractive
– cost effective

Moving Towards 50 kg of Residual Waste Per Resident Per Year! The Almere Upcycle Centre Example

Modulo Recycle
The UpcycleCentre/ Upcycling Centre in Almere is symbolic to what needs to be achieved on National level by 2050. Coming from 350 kg of residual waste production per resident annually Almere City is  currently  at 170 kg of residual waste production per resident annually and now moving to 50 kg of residual waste production per resident annually. As a comparison: The average in The Netherlands currently is 490 kg of residual waste annually. This is the first project of its kind showing what really can be done.
This site is representing the future:  Upcycling.

Modulo ws heavily involved in the design, construction of this site.

The Upcycle Centre in Almere includes a symbol. installed at the front of the building. That is a logo made of recycled material representing the logo of Almere  It is all really well thought  through: the roof, the structures, the recycling platform, the use of the materials, offices, stores, the furniture, the flooring, including even the flushing water for toilets.
As an example, the concrete pad is made from eco-granular, recycled materials from demolished buildings eg the Almere swimming pool, the Almere sports arena, etc..
Spaces are rented out to start up companies, using materials dropped off at the recycling centre.
To build the wooden structure around the building, used wood from the swimming pool and trees which were removed in Almere. The bicycle parking lot is made of old car tires. The wall panels are made from old galvanized steel airducts. The roll doors are the ones previously used at the sports arena.
The Modulo system is made from recycled concrete.
The wooden floor is made by a team of persons with a disability. 13,000 pieces of recycled materials is what it took to make this floor. The same team was also involved in the ceiling , which is made is made out of 1,400 empty bottles.They loved to work on it.
Lights, furniture, for everything we focused on circularity. To redo the furniture, leather was used from old furniture.
The Almere Upycling Center recently was published  in  Holland Circulair Hotspot (https://hollandcircularhotspot.nl/en/case/modulo-resource-and-recovery-centres-modular-environmental-waste-depots/) , initiated by the Dutch Government as it is seeking to promote Dutch examplary initiatives in the field of circulair entrepreneurship. It is publishing leading examples eg  Heineken, Plastic Whale, Rotterzwam, DSM-Niaga, Waste2Aromatics, Waste Transformers, carpet manufacturer  Interface and The Great Bubble Barrier.
Circular Drop off centres
Easy to install, expandable, changeable, moveable and  reusable. These are a few remarks in the Circular Hotspot magazine about Modulo. And also very important, the fact that you can use the deck as well as the space underneath the deck. That space an be used for many purposes, eg hazardous waste, storage, maintenance, offices, changing rooms.
Holland Circulair Hotspot also emphasis the process of working with Modulo. It starts with a so called “ Country-City process” involving all relevant parties to combine existing regulations, future regulatory requirements, existing national, regional, local practices and methods with as a result the development of a number of alternative approaches, scenario’s. Each of those scenario’s will be compared, including traffic and queuing simulations as required, resulting in capital and operating budgets for the different solutions.

For the Upcycling facility in Almere potential future regulatory developments have been considered so that the site can be easily adapt if needed. For future sites focus is not only anymore on waste or recyclables  drop off but more and more on receiving of on reusables, raw materials

Public & Residential Garbage, Waste Drop Off Center

Modulo Solution in Papendrecht, The Netherlands

Modulo Recycle
Two days! That is how long it took to install this  Modulo solution in Papendrecht, The Netherlands.
Modulo just completed installation of one of its solutions ( 80 modular elements) in just 2 days!  The installation occurred in Papendrecht, The Netherlands. Installation of the roofing system, lightning systems are being finalized within the next few days. For the production of the blocks recycled concrete “ eco-granulate”  was used.
From start to finish this project took 16 weeks only.
Reasons for choosing Modulo as the preferred solution:
– the lowest costs  over the lifetime of the project
– its great flexibility
– sustainability
– the use of recycled concrete
– no footings required since the load factors for the system are substantially less as compared to other solutions.
Elevated drop off solutions ensure complete separation between truck traffic and residential/ small business traffic, better logistics, safer working environment,  better bin filling rates and lower costs of logistics and improved user and customer satisfaction ultimately.
Please contact us to learn more about our services and  solutions.
Illegal Dumping Solutions & Garbage Drop Off Center

Illegal Dumping Prevention Guidebook

Modulo Recycle

Illegal dumping, also know as “fly dumping”, “midnight dumping or “wildcat dumping” is a major problem in many communities throughout the united states. It raises significant concerns regarding public health & safety, property values & quality of life. An effective illegal dumping prevention program must be customized to address the factors contributing to the problem in a given community. this handbook contains general information about illegal dumping and guidance for developing a prevention program.

Modulo Recycling & Reuse Centres

NSW Illegal Dumping Strategy 2014–16

Modulo Recycle

1 Introduction

1.1 An integrated approach

Combating illegal dumping is a key priority for the NSW Government and local communities.

NSW 2021: A plan to make NSW number one sets a target to reduce the incidence of large- scale (greater than 200 cubic metres) illegal dumping in Sydney, the Illawarra, Hunter and Central Coast by 30 per cent by 2016.

Illegal dumping is an environmental crime and can cause serious environmental pollution, pose a risk to human health, and impact local amenities and community pride. Cleaning up illegally dumped material is also a significant cost for local communities, councils and public land managers.

For the first time, NSW has a state-wide strategy, the NSW Illegal Dumping Strategy 2014–16 (the Strategy), designed to deliver an integrated approach to combat illegal dumping. The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) is charged with leading the work to deliver the Strategy, coordinating efforts of the many stakeholders working to combat illegal dumping, and managing the funding for that work.

The Strategy uses a multifaceted approach to combat illegal dumping. As part of the Waste Less, Recycle More initiative, the NSW Government has allocated $58 million over five years to support initiatives across NSW, including a pilot program to trial innovative approaches to assist home renovators to dispose of small, non-commercial quantities of asbestos. The fund will also be used to enhance the EPA’s ability to detect and prosecute illegal waste operators.

1.2 Our vision

The NSW Government’s vision is to protect local environments from pollution by reducing the incidence of illegal dumping in our community.

To achieve this vision the Government aims to:

  • reduce the incidence of illegal dumping
  • reduce the social, environmental, health and financial impact of illegal dumping.

Based on feedback received from the consultation for the Strategy and the experience of the EPA, local councils and public land managers, and, six focus areas have been identified:

  1. Partnerships – build local community partnerships
  2. Building an evidence base
  3. Strategic enforcement – ramp-up waste compliance and enforcement
  4. Capacity building – help build expertise
  5. Education – spread the word
  6. Community engagement – motivate local communities.

The EPA will work closely with partners to deliver projects and results in these areas. Table 1 sets out the projects that will be run under each of these focus areas.

1.3 Partnerships

Partnerships are essential in delivering this strategy and local government, waste management groups, industry and community all have a significant role to play. The EPA will take the lead in fostering and maintaining these partnerships.

Illegal Dumping Solutions

Illegal dumping of construction waste costing Lower Mainland taxpayers

Modulo Recycle

During his daily nine-kilometre run along some of Richmond’s rural roads, Andrew Waldichuk started to notice the garbage.

He’d see old appliances, toilets, furniture, garbage bags, Styrofoam and drywall – a lot of drywall. In early January, on a remote strip of Cambie Road, he and his running buddies spotted about 30 bags marked “asbestos” dumped alongside a berry farm. He’d never seen so much illegal construction waste on this stretch of blueberry, cranberry, corn and cattle farms.

Mr. Waldichuk showed me the spot on a sunny day this week. We pulled up to a wide ditch where ducks and a heron lingered. Among the bramble someone had dumped a toilet, garbage bags of drywall and fluorescent-light fixtures. Across the way lay a stack of drywall on the edge of a farm.

The environmental hazards are clear. The area is abundant with bird species. Nearby, workers are crouched, pruning. Mr. Waldichuk, a lawyer who works in Richmond, has made a practice of phoning the city over the dumping. He uses orange pylons to mark the debris to make it easier for city staff to spot.

“I have phoned in couches, furniture, desks, a rotting cow’s head. Everything gets dumped out here,” he says.

“The mercury from that fluorescent tubing will leach into the water here, and that’s a crime.”

Food safety is an issue, too. City of Richmond spokesman Ted Townsend points out that local farmland is filled with irrigation canals. Contaminants from construction waste such as asbestos and mercury could easily seep into the soil.

Illegal dumping – much of it construction and household waste – has become a fact of life for the Lower Mainland. It is the byproduct of a housing boom where the rush is on to make money, get the job done and cut costs. Some people are choosing to dump their garbage instead of making the trip to an out-of-the-way processing facility where they’ll have to pay fees. But the cost of cleanup, which can be substantial, is transferred to the taxpayer.

Because dumping is on the rise in Vancouver, the city is planning to more aggressively tackle the problem this year.

“There’s been so much development and construction going on in the Lower Mainland in general, we are seeing a lot more of it,” says Vancouver’s director of waste management and resource recovery, Albert Shamess. “The only theory I’ve come up with is just the drastic increase in development in the last couple of years. It’s skyrocketed.

“I think it’s driven by economics – people don’t want to pay the tipping fee to dispose of it properly.”

In Vancouver, illegally dumped construction waste was up 20 per cent in 2016 from the year before. In 2015, 6,858 construction waste items were reported, compared with 8,207 in 2016. That doesn’t include furniture, metal and electronics. There were almost 75,000 illegally dumped items found throughout the city last year.

Costs for cleanup and investigation came in at $1.5-million. For 2017, the city has budgeted $1.9-million for cleanup of illegally dumped garbage.

It has budgeted more, Mr. Shamess says, because it’s planning to ramp up its approach to the dumping. He says city crews need to respond more quickly to clean up at the dumping sites, because if they don’t, those sites quickly grow. For some reason, when people see garbage dumped in a spot, they add to it.

“It’s surprising where you do find it – in back lanes, under bridges. One of the challenges we have is wherever there’s an area slated for development, and they put up those blue fences, automatically it becomes a dumping ground.”

He says staff have caught a few of the dumpers. They’ve even been able to track them through the items they’ve dumped, which have included information such as a company name. The fines run from $150 to $10,000.

“We did have some last year that were in the thousands, but we haven’t got up to $10,000,” Mr. Shamess says. “In some cases, it’s individuals or small contractors.”

To get the junk out of the alleys, the city is planning a pilot project this year that will offer big-item pick-up of household goods. Mr. Shamess says they’ve got to figure out the cost of the service, how to pay for it and other logistics.

Surrey has had a similar program for the past decade, but the problem is that most people don’t know about it. So part of the city’s attack plan on garbage is to educate people that they don’t have to drop that furnace or couch in the back alley. The city will pick it up.

Rob Costanzo, manager of engineering operations, says Surrey spent a little more than $1-million on cleanup costs from illegal dumping in 2015. The amount had doubled since 2005. Again, the increase correlated with housing construction. At one point, he says, they even hired former police officers to sit in cars at dumping locations at night and try to catch people. It didn’t work.

“A good majority of it is construction type waste, or renovation type waste,” Mr. Costanzo says. “We are trying to wrap our heads around how to reduce the impact of illegal dumping.”

It hasn’t been easy because Surrey is geographically big. But after a year of aggressively tackling the problem, it has gotten cleanup costs down to $580,000. The next phase is a pilot project in the northwest part of the city involving 2,200 households, which has been hit hardest with dumping.

“We’re placing cameras in the neighbourhood, and going door to door, to knock on doors and let them know about the large-item pickup program, educate them about illegal dumping and bylaw infractions,” Mr. Costanzo says.

If their efforts have an impact, they’ll tackle other areas of Surrey.