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Chemical Waste Disposal

Household Hazardous Waste Recycling Site Geleen, The Nethherlands

Modulo Recycle

The Municipality of Sittard-Geleen was seeking a total concept solution to deal with its HHW. Before it decided to build a permanent Household Hazardous Waste facility, HHW was collected through event days and through the use of Household Hazardous Waste collection vehicles. Sittard-Geleen decided to build a Modular Household Hazardous Waste facility. Modulo established 3 fire resistant compartments with one central receiving/working area.

The site is in compliance with all European and Dutch Regulations (Guidelines for Environmental Protection Measures and Chemical Waste Storage, National and International Fire Codes). It has all fire safety features, including 3 hours fire rated walls, fire rated self closing doors, spill containment with self –contained sumps, chemical resistant removable gratings, certified electrical, electrical center connections, outlets, emergency eye/face wash station, lockable doors, emergency lights, exterior lighting, insulation, heating and temperature control, ventilation, shelves, access into each compartment, warranty.

Local Waste Disposal Centre

Recycling site in Høje Tåstrup, Denmark

Modulo Recycle

Høje Tåstrup municipality partnering with Vestforbrænding renovated the recycling site in Høje Tåstrup. The recycling site was not meeting today’s requirements, and it was, therefore, decided to make it more user friendly, to establish better participation, and to provide improved facilities.

It was important for the municipality to make the site visit easier to understand for visitors, to establish a better separation and easier access to the different fractions. It was decided the most convenient way establish the goals would be to build a new elevated platform in combination with a modular building for hazardous waste, both being Modulo solutions.

The site was closed in October. Construction work commenced and included ao paving a new larger area for garden waste, sewer, lightning. The elevated Modulo platform was installed on a new slab accommodating 18 bins. Including the new Modulo solution for hazardous waste, the site was able to reopen after only 100 days!

Modulo installed the elevated 18 bins solution as well as the hazardous waste solution. The height of the modules: 3.9 ft. Site elevation differences were used to create a smart solution. Further, safety railings were provided for ramps only. The lower platform in combination with higher bins ensured railings did not need to be installed.

The hazardous waste solution included supply and install 6 modules, doors, windows, sumps, grating, aeration, and point suction solutions.

Kenneth Bøg, Vestforbrænding:
High Tåstrup recycling site needed an upgrade as residents had to use stairs to get rid of waste and recyclables. It was dangerous and resulted in sub-optimal bin filling and higher costs of logistics. Modulo solved those issues.
Modulo understood our needs, and as a result, Modulo was the preferred solution. The entire process from the design phase to completion was what we expected.

Hazardous Waste Solution Galten, Denmark

Modulo Recycle

Modulo has successfully completed the hazardous waste solutions at Galten Recycling Site, Reno Syd, Denmark. The modules ensure compliance with regulations and ensure safe storage of hazardous waste, facilitating to separate storage for the different hazardous waste classes.

The solution includes automatically closing fire-rated doors, explosion-proof lighting, aeration including point suction for 15 drums, exit doors, exit signs.

The Galten Modulo project includes 6 modules.

At one end of the solution, there is an emergency exit door, which is only served by the space workers. Waste-proof vessels are fitted with mounted electrical windows for collecting hazardous waste.

Modulo’s hazardous waste solution ensures a safe environment for humans and material- Johnny Pedersen, Operations Manager Renosyd

From waste to value Renosyd is a waste company owned by Odder Municipality and Skanderborg Municipality. Renosyd serves businesses and citizens in an area of 66,123 hectares with a total of approximately 80,000 inhabitants. Renosyd is a modern and versatile waste company with 70 competent employees.

E Waste Management Company

Recycling Center in Ørbæk, Denmark

Modulo Recycle

Nyborg Supply decided to expand its existing recycling facility in Ørbæk. The significant upgrade included ao washrooms an elevated platform.

” When it was apparent we needed to change, Modulo became the preferred supplier. Its modular solutions provide unlimited possibilities to change, adapt, grow. It is simply the best, smartest and most economical solution over the lifetime of these types of projects since it allows for quick changes without a lot of work and you do not have to demolish anything.

We are very excited about a split level solution: it allows our residents to dispose of their recyclables very easily”says waste manager Søren Littrup Kristensen.

The recycling center in Ørbæk services approx. 6,000 citizens a year, and as the space was outdated and the residents and employees were struggling.

In addition to more space and better traction, we were able to separate truck -and other traffic, ensuring improved safety for all working/ visiting the site.

The brand new fully refurbished recycling facility was completed in the summer of 2013 and has created a lighter / better working environment for both visitors and employees.

Employees have improved working conditions in terms of better facilities and heated facilities. “Before we had no heating, no doors in our locker room, which meant we always froze when we were at work. With the new Modulo solution, we were able to heat those facilities we wanted to heat, including in the kitchen, offices and hazardous waste management.

Our space for hazardous waste storage also has dramatically improved. Now we are able to offer citizens better handling of hazardous waste and other recyclables: it is organized, safe, clean and clear.

All in all, we have now got a much more user-friendly and modern recycling space, which has so far accommodated all our wishes and needs for a new recycling facility – and in addition, at a relatively low budget”.

There is always a need for a change, even when it comes to waste management. Modulo was the preferred partner, since their solution, without a doubt, was the most valuable and affordable one! – Søren Littrup Kristensen, waste manager Nyborg Supply, Ørbæk ”

Nyborg Supply & Service A / S is Nyborg Municipality’s utility company. Nyborg Forsyning & Service A / S supplies supply services in Nyborg Municipality through its subsidiaries in the areas of water, district heating, renovation, and wastewater.

NFS Renovation A / S is a subsidiary of Nyborg For sewing & Service. NFS Renovation A / S is responsible for the disposal of day-to-day repairs from all households and institutions in Nyborg Municipality as well as the companies that have registered for the day-care scheme.

In addition, NFS Renovation A / S operates the recycling stations in Nyborg, Ullerslev and Ørbæk and a compressor station in Nyborg. Recycling islands are located in Nyborg Municipality and association collections of recyclable materials. Nyborg Supply & Service employs 57 employees and serves approx. 19,000 customers.

“ Our new modular Modulo concrete solution has given us the assurance that we can keep up with the development in the future and facilitate the expansion of the space, if necessary. We had a small and unorganized site, we now have a larger, user-friendly and more modern site, with greater capacity, better logistics and better working conditions for our employees. And our residents are very happy with it.

Modulo concrete has managed to create a modern recycling site at a relatively low budget. The process and cooperation with Modulo have been very successful – and we highly recommend the extremely modular Modulo solution”. – Søren Littrup Kristensen Nyborg Supply in Ørbæk

Convenience Center for Waste Management

Convenience Center, Woerden, The Netherlands

Modulo Recycle

Woerden, The Netherlands recycling site has heat traced ramps and facilitates offices, storage, reuse, and HHW underneath the deck. The site is in compliance with all European Regulations (Guidelines for Environmental Protection Measures and Chemical Waste Storage, National and International Fire Codes). It has all fire safety features, including 3 hours fire rated walls, fire rated self closing doors, spill containment with self-contained sumps, chemical resistant removable gratings, certified electrical, electrical centre connections, outlets, emergency eye/face wash station, lockable doors, emergency lights, exterior lighting, insulation, heating and temperature control, ventilation, shelves, access into each compartment and warranty.

 

Modulo Béton – Innovation Solution for the Construction of HWRCs

Modulo Recycle

Modulo Beton Household Waste Recycling Centres Limited were delighted to be shortlisted as a finalist in the “Innovation in the Design of a Waste Management Facility” section of Letsrecyle’s Awards for Excellence recently.

At a sumptuous award ceremony held at the Landmark Hotel in Marylebone, (London), Modulo Beton’s UK Director of Business & Facility Development, Ian Dudding, received the certificate presented by BBC Breakfast’s host Susanna Reid.

Modulo Béton UK’s CEO, Henk Verkouille, said, “Household Waste Recycling Centres are often overlooked as focus typically centres on developing major waste infrastructure. However, Modulo Béton has demonstrated that HWRCs can also be (re)constructed in an innovative and cost effective way, endorsing the role of these increasingly vital, public-facing facilities”.

To find out how a Modulo Béton solution may address your HWRC needs please contact info@modulo-beton.com . In addition, Ian Dudding has also recently become Chair of the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management’s London & Southern Counties Centre and can be met at most of the (monthly) Open Meetings held by the Centre, or can otherwise be contacted any time on ian.dudding@modulo-beton.co.uk

Modulo Béton HWRCs Ltd will also be exhibiting at this year’s “RWM With CIWM” Exhibition, at the Birmingham NEC, from 10-12th September 2013. Visit us on stand 17E38.

Modulo Recycling & Reuse Centres

Mobilising The Public to Avoid Illegal Dumping of Bulky Waste

Modulo Recycle

Introduction

Used furniture and mattresses, broken television sets, refrigerators, building materials, packaging and branches piling up by the road side or at open grounds is very unsightly. This is, however, a very common and highly visible reality in many urban and rural areas throughout Malaysia.

Any unauthorised disposal of waste at public or privately-owned land is considered illegal dumping. Households, businesses, contractors and waste collectors who are not willing to travel the distance to proper disposal sites or to pay for the transport or tipping fees are all common offenders.

Waste types commonly found illegally dumped include:

  • Used furniture and mattresses
  • Household appliances and electrical goods such as washing machine, television, radio, computer
  • Green wastes such as branches and trees stumps
  • Construction wastes such as bricks and concrete
  • Commercial and industrial waste such as packaging materials and off-cuts

Illegal dump sites tend to continue accumulating waste once the site has been used as an illegal dumping site and to reappear immediately after having been cleared.

Illegal dump sites are very un-aesthetic, being a very visible eyesore and creating an unpleasant environment. However, this is not the only problem with illegal dumping.

Illegal dumping can disrupt proper drainage areas, causing them to become more susceptible to flooding. Dumping can disturb vegetation and wildlife and it can contaminate soil, surface as well as ground water, giving rise to severe negative environmental impact.

In addition, illegal dump sites often become breeding ground for rodents, insects and vermins which may be disease-carriers. Besides, they also pose as a risk to people, especially children who enter the illegal dump sites might be exposed to physical injuries from sharp edges, protruding nails, etc. or to diseases through contact with infectious or poisonous materials.

Local Authorities spend huge sums every year clearing illegal dump sites, including cleaning up drains and rivers which are often clogged by illegally dumped waste. As much as RM 50 million may be spent by the Local Authorities every year on clearing illegal dump sites in Peninsular Malaysia.

Waste Management Services

Litter and illegal Waste Management Strategy

Modulo Recycle

What’s the problem?

The number of requests to respond to litter and illegal waste issues has steadily been increasing in the Township of Langley (Township). Litter and
illegal waste is a concern, as it pollutes the streets, parks, waterways, and the local environment. With population projections indicating continued growth
throughout the Township, it is expected that the number of requests will continue to increase; unless new steps are taken to reduce litter and illegal waste.

What’s the solution?
To effectively deal with litter and illegal waste, a comprehensive Township-wide strategy has been created to focus on a proactive approach. It is based on three fundamental pillars – education, infrastructure, and enforcement. This strategy was created with input from the public, including various stakeholder groups. Input was gathered from focus groups and also a public survey, completed in 2014.

Illegal Dumping Solutions

Illegal dumping of construction waste costing Lower Mainland taxpayers

Modulo Recycle

During his daily nine-kilometre run along some of Richmond’s rural roads, Andrew Waldichuk started to notice the garbage.

He’d see old appliances, toilets, furniture, garbage bags, Styrofoam and drywall – a lot of drywall. In early January, on a remote strip of Cambie Road, he and his running buddies spotted about 30 bags marked “asbestos” dumped alongside a berry farm. He’d never seen so much illegal construction waste on this stretch of blueberry, cranberry, corn and cattle farms.

Mr. Waldichuk showed me the spot on a sunny day this week. We pulled up to a wide ditch where ducks and a heron lingered. Among the bramble someone had dumped a toilet, garbage bags of drywall and fluorescent-light fixtures. Across the way lay a stack of drywall on the edge of a farm.

The environmental hazards are clear. The area is abundant with bird species. Nearby, workers are crouched, pruning. Mr. Waldichuk, a lawyer who works in Richmond, has made a practice of phoning the city over the dumping. He uses orange pylons to mark the debris to make it easier for city staff to spot.

“I have phoned in couches, furniture, desks, a rotting cow’s head. Everything gets dumped out here,” he says.

“The mercury from that fluorescent tubing will leach into the water here, and that’s a crime.”

Food safety is an issue, too. City of Richmond spokesman Ted Townsend points out that local farmland is filled with irrigation canals. Contaminants from construction waste such as asbestos and mercury could easily seep into the soil.

Illegal dumping – much of it construction and household waste – has become a fact of life for the Lower Mainland. It is the byproduct of a housing boom where the rush is on to make money, get the job done and cut costs. Some people are choosing to dump their garbage instead of making the trip to an out-of-the-way processing facility where they’ll have to pay fees. But the cost of cleanup, which can be substantial, is transferred to the taxpayer.

Because dumping is on the rise in Vancouver, the city is planning to more aggressively tackle the problem this year.

“There’s been so much development and construction going on in the Lower Mainland in general, we are seeing a lot more of it,” says Vancouver’s director of waste management and resource recovery, Albert Shamess. “The only theory I’ve come up with is just the drastic increase in development in the last couple of years. It’s skyrocketed.

“I think it’s driven by economics – people don’t want to pay the tipping fee to dispose of it properly.”

In Vancouver, illegally dumped construction waste was up 20 per cent in 2016 from the year before. In 2015, 6,858 construction waste items were reported, compared with 8,207 in 2016. That doesn’t include furniture, metal and electronics. There were almost 75,000 illegally dumped items found throughout the city last year.

Costs for cleanup and investigation came in at $1.5-million. For 2017, the city has budgeted $1.9-million for cleanup of illegally dumped garbage.

It has budgeted more, Mr. Shamess says, because it’s planning to ramp up its approach to the dumping. He says city crews need to respond more quickly to clean up at the dumping sites, because if they don’t, those sites quickly grow. For some reason, when people see garbage dumped in a spot, they add to it.

“It’s surprising where you do find it – in back lanes, under bridges. One of the challenges we have is wherever there’s an area slated for development, and they put up those blue fences, automatically it becomes a dumping ground.”

He says staff have caught a few of the dumpers. They’ve even been able to track them through the items they’ve dumped, which have included information such as a company name. The fines run from $150 to $10,000.

“We did have some last year that were in the thousands, but we haven’t got up to $10,000,” Mr. Shamess says. “In some cases, it’s individuals or small contractors.”

To get the junk out of the alleys, the city is planning a pilot project this year that will offer big-item pick-up of household goods. Mr. Shamess says they’ve got to figure out the cost of the service, how to pay for it and other logistics.

Surrey has had a similar program for the past decade, but the problem is that most people don’t know about it. So part of the city’s attack plan on garbage is to educate people that they don’t have to drop that furnace or couch in the back alley. The city will pick it up.

Rob Costanzo, manager of engineering operations, says Surrey spent a little more than $1-million on cleanup costs from illegal dumping in 2015. The amount had doubled since 2005. Again, the increase correlated with housing construction. At one point, he says, they even hired former police officers to sit in cars at dumping locations at night and try to catch people. It didn’t work.

“A good majority of it is construction type waste, or renovation type waste,” Mr. Costanzo says. “We are trying to wrap our heads around how to reduce the impact of illegal dumping.”

It hasn’t been easy because Surrey is geographically big. But after a year of aggressively tackling the problem, it has gotten cleanup costs down to $580,000. The next phase is a pilot project in the northwest part of the city involving 2,200 households, which has been hit hardest with dumping.

“We’re placing cameras in the neighbourhood, and going door to door, to knock on doors and let them know about the large-item pickup program, educate them about illegal dumping and bylaw infractions,” Mr. Costanzo says.

If their efforts have an impact, they’ll tackle other areas of Surrey.

Modulo Recycling & Reuse Centres

Fears of illegal dumping rise as West Cork waste centres cut opening hours

Modulo Recycle

Public visits to waste and recycling centres in West Cork have significantly reduced since their opening hours were cut — leading to fears of illegal dumping.

Figures released by Cork County Council’s environmental services show West Cork was worst hit by opening times of civic amenity sites throughout the county.

A comparision of figures between July-September 2014 and the corresponding period this year showed the three sites under the control of the municipal body in West Cork all had reduced visitor numbers.

Recycleable tonnage at Derryconnell on the Mizen peninsula and sites in Clonakilty and Castletownbere also fell, but waste tonnage slightly increased at all three sites.

At Derryconnell, near Schull, 5,587 public visitors had been recorded in the third quarter of 2014. Following reduced opening hours in 2015, the third quarter figures for the Mizen site were 4,818.

Clonakilty visits fell from 7,793 to 7,681 in the same period while Castletownbere fell to 4,170, down from 4,529.

The council had, this year, decided to rationalise opening hours and deploy its civic amenity site personnel during “quieter times” to specialist units which tackle litter in blackspot dumping areas.

Sharon Corcoran, head of the council’s environment directorate, admitted the public visits to recycling centres were down, but said the amount of waste being taken to the sites had not dropped.

However, she said while she did not believe new measures were leading to more illegal littering, she admitted it may take a full 12 months of monitoring to get the true picture.

She based her belief on figures which showed the amount of tonnage going through the civic amenity centres.

Ms Corcoran made the comment after Cllr Michael Collins (Ind) highlighted the risk of illegal dumping due to reduced opening hours of the sites.

Cllr Joe Carroll (FF) and Cllr Noel O’Donovan (FG) both indicated they were concerned about the state of a smaller recycling centre in Skibbereen, which was subject to flooding.

Cllr Carroll said he recently visited the site. If he had planned to use it, he would “have to wade through a foot of water”.

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